Documentation

The IAYFJM present in these web pages studies, researches, book or film reviews and other publications concerning the topic of juvenile and family justice, made by:

 

  • IAYFJM
  • regional or national Associations of Juvenile and Family Judges
  • international, regional or national Public Institutions
  • international, regional or national NGO
  • Public or Private Networks
  • Universities
  • Professionals

Children – not terrorists! Bringing children home from ISIL

Children – not terrorists! Bringing children home from ISIL An estimated 4640 children travelled to Iraq or Syria, either alone or with their families, to join the so-called Islamic State. Since the fall of the terrorist group, many of them live in displacement camps under deplorable conditions. They have not only been victims of recruitment or trafficking, but also witnessed extreme violence and indoctrination. We call on State authorities for an urgent response to guarantee their rights. Before and after the proclamation of the caliphate of the so-called Islamic State in 2014, people from over 80 countries travelled to Iraq and Syria to join the terrorist group. Taken unwillingly or recruited, children have been used to carry weapons, guard strategic locations, arrest civilians, but have also been subject to sexual violence, forced marriage, or were exploited in suicide bombings. With the defeat of ISIL, their nightmare is not over: in the al-Hol camp in Northern Syria which hosts most of the displaced people from ISIL occupied territories and relatives of ISIL fighters, 371 children died in 2019 as a result of the deplorable living conditions. The right to return Regardless of their role, of whether they had been recruited or their parents were involved with ISIL, these children have rights set out in the Convention on the Rights of the Child. States who have ratified the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the involvement of children in armed conflict, such as Switzerland, have the obligation to demobilise children recruited by these groups and assume their reintegration into the society. We call on all authorities to accept their international responsibility for their citizens by repatriating them, especially children. States must facilitate their rehabilitation and recovery. They must ensure that children are not separated from their parents unless it’s in their best interest and that they are never criminalised purely for their association or membership of a terrorist group. Find out more about the situation of children who have been enrolled in armed groups, their rights and what Tdh and its partners recommend by reading our position paper “Bringing Children Home: A children’s rights approach to returning from ISIL”

Children – not terrorists! Bringing children home from ISIL

An estimated 4640 children travelled to Iraq or Syria, either alone or with their families, to join the so-called Islamic State. Since the fall of the terrorist group, many of them live in displacement camps under deplorable conditions. They have not only been victims of recruitment or trafficking, but also witnessed extreme violence and indoctrination. We call on State authorities for an urgent response to guarantee their rights.

Before and after the proclamation of the caliphate of the so-called Islamic State in 2014, people from over 80 countries travelled to Iraq and Syria to join the terrorist group. Taken unwillingly or recruited, children have been used to carry weapons, guard strategic locations, arrest civilians, but have also been subject to sexual violence, forced marriage, or were exploited in suicide bombings.

With the defeat of ISIL, their nightmare is not over: in the al-Hol camp in Northern Syria which hosts most of the displaced people from ISIL occupied territories and relatives of ISIL fighters, 371 children died in 2019 as a result of the deplorable living conditions.

The right to return

Regardless of their role, of whether they had been recruited or their parents were involved with ISIL, these children have rights set out in the Convention on the Rights of the Child. States who have ratified the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the involvement of children in armed conflict, such as Switzerland, have the obligation to demobilise children recruited by these groups and assume their reintegration into the society. 

We call on all authorities to accept their international responsibility for their citizens by repatriating them, especially children. States must facilitate their rehabilitation and recovery. They must ensure that children are not separated from their parents unless it’s in their best interest and that they are never criminalised purely for their association or membership of a terrorist group.

Find out more about the situation of children who have been enrolled in armed groups, their rights and what Tdh and its partners recommend by reading our position paper “Bringing Children Home: A children’s rights approach to returning from ISIL” 


 

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Paris Declaration - 2018

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Protecting the rights of the child in humanitarian situations

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T.A.L.E. project

The project, financed by the EC Commission, Rights, Equality and Citizenship (REC) Programme started on November 2015 and ended on October 2017. The coordinator of the project is Save the Children Italia and the partners are: Scuola Superiore dell’Avvocatura (Italy), Save the Children Romania (Romania), Defence for Children International (Belgium), Instituto de Apoio a Crianca (Portugal), Liverpool University (UK), La Merced Migraciones (Madrid). The 24-month project aimed at offering training to lawyers representing children in judicial proceedings on the international instruments to promote and protect children’s rights and the correct implementation of the CoE CFJ Guidelines principles at national level. This training contained both theoretical and practical elements from a distinctly children’s rights perspective. Through a consultation activity with children involved in legal proceedings the project wanted to ensure that lawyers’ training includes children's voices. The project also produced and disseminated online training materials, developed and tested in the training workshops. Here the link to the online training materials

The project, financed by the EC Commission, Rights, Equality and Citizenship (REC) Programme started on November 2015 and ended on October 2017.

The coordinator of the project is Save the Children Italia and the partners are: Scuola Superiore dell’Avvocatura (Italy), Save the Children Romania (Romania), Defence for Children International (Belgium), Instituto de Apoio a Crianca (Portugal), Liverpool University (UK), La Merced Migraciones (Madrid).

The 24-month project aimed at offering training to lawyers representing children in judicial proceedings on the international instruments to promote and protect children’s rights and the correct implementation of the CoE CFJ Guidelines principles at national level. This training contained both theoretical and practical elements from a distinctly children’s rights perspective. Through a consultation activity with children involved in legal proceedings the project wanted to ensure that lawyers’ training includes children's voices. The project also produced and disseminated online training materials, developed and tested in the training workshops.

Here the link to the online training materials

Guidelines on Children in Contact with the Justice System (IAYFJM)

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The case-law of the European Court of Human Rights concerning criminal juvenile justice by Françoise Tulkens

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Book review: International indians and the law by Anil Malhotra and Ranjit Malhotra

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Book review: Rights, Scarcity and Justice by Gustavo Arosemena Solorzao

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Book review: Litigating the Rights of the Child by Ton Liefaard and Jaap Doek

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Book review: The effective Youth Court by Stephanie Rap and Ido Weijers

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Book review: Surrogacy in India by Anil Malhotra and Ranjit Malhotra

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Juvenile Justice Law and POCSO by Anil Malhotra

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Intolerance in surrogacy by Anil Malhotra

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Tunis Declaration

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Belfast Declaration

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Report of the Committee appointed to propose principles of Judicial Etichs for Youth and Familiy Judge and Magistrates

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